Vicious circles of gender bias, lower positions, and lower performance: Gender differences in scholarly productivity and impact

About (English version): 

It is often argued that female researchers publish on average less than male researchers do, but male and female authored papers have an equal impact. In this paper we try to better understand this phenomenon by (i) comparing the share of male and female researchers within different productivity classes, and (ii) by comparing productivity whereas controlling for a series of relevant covariates. The study is based on a disambiguated Swedish author dataset, consisting of 47,000 researchers and their WoS-publications during the period of 2008-2011 with citations until 2015. As the analysis shows, in order to have impact quantity does make a difference for male and female researchers alike—but women are vastly underrepresented in the group of most productive researchers. Wediscuss and test several possible explanations of this finding, using a data on personal characteristics from several Swedish universities. Gender differences in age, authorship position, and academic rank do explain quite a part of the productivity differences.

van den Besselaar P, Sandström U, Janssens F, et al. (2017) Vicious circles of gender bias, lower positions, and lower performance: Gender differences in scholarly productivity and impact. Dorta-González P (ed.), PLOS ONE, Springer 12(8): e0183301.

Public identifier: 
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0183301
Type of resource: 
Media Type: 
Digital Document (pdf, doc, ppt, txt, etc.)
Language(s): 
English
Date created: 
2017
Is this resource freely shareable?: 
Shareable
Total energy: 
140

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